David’s Refuge from the Wicked

Psalm 86 is titled, ‘A Prayer of David’. Many of the psalms of David are prayers, and David was clearly a man of prayer, as well as one who was divinely lead to write psalms of praise. Thus we have, in the Psalms, as in so many other places of Scripture, a reminder of how important prayer is in the life of the Christian.

In verses 14-16 of Psalm 86, David writes, “O God, the proud are risen against me, and the assemblies of violent men have sought after my soul; and have not set thee before them. But thou, O Lord, art a God full of compassion, and gracious, long suffering, and plenteous in mercy and truth. O turn unto me, and have mercy upon me; give thy strength unto thy servant, and save the son of thine handmaid.”

Here we have, in the first place, the complaint that David made to God. He does not complain of God’s dealings with him, but of men’s dealings with him. He prayerfully spreads these before God. Such wicked persons are described as proud, and in the same breath, they are termed as having risen against him. Thus, Matthew Henry, makes the point, ‘Many are made persecutors by their pride…’ David goes on to speak of violent men who have sought after his soul, and Matthew Henry writes, ‘the design is not only to depose but to destroy.’ Why are they doing these things against David? What could be one reason why they are so disposed? David himself makes it clear when he writes, “…and have not set thee before them.” They were not walking in the fear of God.

From such sad complaint and from such painful experience of the malice of the wicked, David turns by faith to God. He pens a very beautiful reflection upon the character of the God who cares for him. “But thou, O Lord, art a God full of compassion, and gracious, long suffering, and plenteous in mercy and truth.” As C H Spurgeon writes, What a contrast! We get away from the hectorings and blusterings of proud but puny men to the glory and goodness of the Lord.’ Perhaps David has considered that which we read in Exodus 34:6, where God reveals Himself to Moses, ‘And the LORD passed by before him, and proclaimed, The LORD, The LORD God, merciful and gracious, longsuffering, and abundant in goodness and truth…’ If so, ought not we, in our day, to reflect on such a wonderful revelation of the character of God?

This consideration of the care of so great a God for him, led David to cry in prayer to the Almighty. “O turn unto me, and have mercy upon me; give thy strength unto thy servant, and save the son of thine handmaid.” As the commentator W S Plumer observes, ‘The strength sought would effect deliverance and impart courage.’

If David, is to go on, in spite of his enemies, then He pleads for the help of God. So we see, how very suitable this prayer of David is for the Lord’s dear people in this day too.

G B Macdonald

sydneyfpchurch.org.au

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.